Tag Archives: square feet

US Office Vacancy Lowest in 10 Years

Post By : admin 23 March 2018 Leave a comment

According to a report produced by Transwestern, office vacancies in the US as a whole are at their lowest in 10 years. That’s pretty amazing when you consider that they also report that 70.7 million square feet (SF) of new construction has been started during that same period. But office demand follows job creation so with unemployment at 4.1%, the lowest since late 2000, this makes sense.

The top 10 markets for net absorption (the net change in the total SF of office space occupied) were lead by Dallas/Fort Worth with over 5 million SF absorbed, followed by San Jose/Silicon Valley with about half that, then Settle, Northern Virginia, Austin, Phoenix, Detroit, Las Vegas, St. Louis and Baltimore.

Notwithstanding the top absorption markets, the top 10 markets for rent growth looked different: Boston at 15%, followed by San Francisco, Charlotte, Orlando, Raleigh/Durham, Oklahoma City, East Bay/Oakland, Phoenix, Los Angeles and Portland. Some of those intuitively make sense because they are land-constrained cities with a huge tech presence. Others were a surprise.

The cities with the most new space under construction are New York with over 16 million SF underway, Dallas/Fort Worth with over 8 million SF coming, Washington, DC at 7.6 million SF, San Francisco at 6 million SF, and Denver at 5 million SF.

The future looks bright for the national office market so long as jobs hold up. If there is a downturn in the economy and companies stop hiring and start laying workers off, things will change.

For the rest of the report, click here.

Bob Gibbons is a Real Estate Advisor & Tenant Advocate (also known as a tenant rep) with REATA Commercial Realty, Inc. which is a tenant advisory firm based in Plano, Texas. Bob serves companies in Plano, Frisco, McKinney, Allen, Richardson, Addison, Dallas and the surrounding areas and specializes in companies which lease or buy office and warehouse properties.

Categories: Uncategorized

A Ban on Dual Agency Fails…For Now

Post By : admin 16 January 2018 Leave a comment

As you probably know, at REATA, we only represent users – companies that lease or buy office and warehouse space. We won’t take landlord listings for lease because it has the potential to create conflicts of interest.

Furthermore, we don’t think that real estate companies should be allowed to represent both sides of a transaction. That would mean that one agent in BrokerageCo (made up name) shouldn’t be allowed to represent the landlord or seller while another agent in the same BrokerageCo represents the tenant or buyer.

Fortunately, some powerful forces in the industry are starting to agree with us and take action to make this mandatory.

California Assembly Bill 1059 is legislation that was crafted to end “dual agency” (it’s called “intermediary” in Texas). While the specific provision ending this practice was removed from the bill before it made it to committee, the good news is that it was considered at all. It has to be discussed a few times before it actually becomes law.

This all began in 2007 when a Hong Kong businessman sued Coldwell Banker and its agents. He had been represented by a Coldwell Banker agent as had the seller. When a giant discrepancy was found in the size of the property he purchased (long after closing), he filed suit. It went all the way to the California Supreme Court which determined that Coldwell Banker failed in its fiduciary responsibility to him. That was a lightning bolt decision.

The United Kingdom is ahead of the USA on this issue. The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (think of them as the UK version of the National Association of Realtors) in early 2017 created a policy statement with strict conflict-of-interest requirements which specifically bans the practice in the UK.

So the government and industry groups appear to be moving in the right direction. It will likely take several more years, but we’re hopeful that all concerned will do the right thing for clients whether legislation requires it or not.

A more-comprehensive article is available here if you want to learn more.

Bob Gibbons is a Real Estate Advisor & Tenant Advocate with REATA Commercial Realty, Inc. which is a tenant advisory firm based in Plano, Texas. Bob serves companies in Plano, Frisco, McKinney, Allen, Richardson, Addison, Dallas and the surrounding areas and specializes in companies which lease or buy office and warehouse properties.

Categories: Uncategorized

Your Building May be Growing – Rentable Square Feet Get an Update

Post By : admin 3 October 2017 Leave a comment

Your building may be growing. That sounds like a ridiculous idea, right? But it may be true. Not physically, of course, but in the way the size is determined.

We have blogged in the past about buildings are measured and the difference between the useable square footage (SF) of a building and the rentable. Here’s a link to our blog post from December 2015. In that post we demonstrate how the common areas of a building are allocated to each tenant based on their share of the building. This commons areas include restrooms, elevator lobbies, electrical rooms, and others. Once the share of the common areas for each tenant is added to the useable area they get to use exclusively, you arrive at the rentable SF. And it’s the rentable SF that is used to calculate rent.

The industry group that determines the methodology of measuring building is called the Building Owners and Managers Association or BOMA. Their main purpose is to create a uniform basis for measuring new and old buildings so that they can be compared with greater accuracy. Periodically, they update the standards and 2017 is a year in which they have done just that.

The architectural firm Gensler just put out a short article about the 2017 update.

Landlords have been adding new amenities to make their buildings more attractive to prospective tenants. These include things like rooftop terraces, tenant lounges, bicycle storage, fitness centers, etc. Some of these amenities are considered common area and should, therefore, be allocated to tenants.

That’s how the building may grow. It’s not really growing, but the common area may increase due to these amenities which increase the allocation to each tenant. Thus, your rentable area may increase.

Many landlords won’t go to the expense of remeasuring their building. Others will already have the data with which to do the calculations. But it’s unlikely that they will try to change the size of your space in the middle of a tenant’s lease term. Typically, they will wait until your lease is up for renewal or you want to expand. Then they will change the size.

This is a legitimate thing for a landlord to do, however. I’m not throwing them under the bus here. Something that is truly an amenity shared by all tenants for which the landlord is not charging a separate fee is fair game for being included in the common area calculations.

Just know that this may occur and be prepared with a corporate real estate advisor like REATA to negotiate your next extension, expansion or relocation.

Bob Gibbons is a Real Estate Advisor & Tenant Advocate with REATA Commercial Realty, Inc. which is a tenant advisory firm based in Plano, Texas. Bob serves companies in Plano, Frisco, McKinney, Allen, Richardson, Addison, Dallas and the surrounding areas and specializes in companies which lease or buy office and warehouse properties.

Categories: Uncategorized